Cheryl Hines apparently doesn't want you thinking of her when her husband rants about vaccines, Nazis, and Anne Frank.

But that's just what happened after Robert F. Kennedy Jr.'s latest rant. People wanted to know if Hines approves, but she has tried to distance herself from her husband's remarks.

Cheryl Hines turns on husband RFK Jr. after Anne Frank rant

Hines, 56, has been married to Kennedy since 2014, and he's one of the loudest anti-vax conspiracy theorists around.

At a recent anti-vax rally, Kennedy's speech included absurd and offensive comments about the Holocaust and the life of Anne Frank.

Kennedy ranted that vaccine mandates and surveillance today are more extreme than life in Nazi Germany.

"Even in Hitler's Germany, you could hide in the attic like Anne Frank did," he claimed. "Today the mechanisms are being put in place so none of us can run and none of us can hide."

Twitter users began tagging Hines on videos of the pathetic rant, and she initially answered: "My husband's opinions are not a reflection of my own. While we love each other, we differ on many current issues."

After the vague response, Hines tweeted a full statement distancing herself from her husband's views on the Holocaust.

Hines wrote: "My husband's reference to Anne Frank at a mandate rally in D.C. was reprehensible and insensitive.

"The atrocities that millions endured during the Holocaust should never be compared to anyone or anything. His opinions are not a reflection of my own."

Not all are buying Hines's condemnation of her husband. She is nearly getting ratioed by this reply: "This isn't the first time. His opinions may not be a reflection of your own, but it is a reflection on you that you tolerate it."

The two have been married for seven years. Hines is probably best known for her days acting on Curb Your Enthusiasm.

And since it apparently needs to be said: the life of Anne Frank, a Jewish child murdered by the Nazis after years in hiding during the Holocaust, bears no resemblance to vaccine mandates and conspiracy theories about satellites.